Fail

Fail

Middle English: from Old French faillir (verb), faille (noun), based on Latin fallere “deceive”, “trick”.

Most of the time, failure is seen in its dictionary meaning, as a lack of success. Declaring ourselves failures may therefore mean that we have not been able to reach a goal, realise a desire and that nothing important has been concluded that has value for ourselves and for others. But failure has a subjective – as well as an objective – dimension.
In fact, the term takes on a symbolic meaning that affects the person and his identity. The concept is frequently associated with terms such as: uselessness, shame, disaster, debt, forfeiture and impossibility.
In all these cases, failure is experienced as an indelible mark, a social stigma that undermines the esteem of others and our self-esteem, questioning desires and abilities.

But the etymology of the word provides us with a different perspective. It is often said that the word fallacious is used to indicate something that has misled us because it does not correspond to what it seemed to promise, which is far from the expectation it had created. The loser is the one who misleads or has been misled.
How many times do we feel we are losers because someone has deceived us (a partner, a friend or our employer) or we have dashed our expectations by not achieving the goals we had set for ourselves?
It is the idea of deception, of the “hoax”, of the “game” that is often hidden behind the word failure and that leads us to consider the experience we have lived in a negative way. We feel that someone has betrayed our expectations by mocking us or we ourselves have betrayed our dreams by not making them come true. That we have been too trusting, or someone has stolen our good faith.
Failure is therefore a source of disappointment (from delusio or illusion and from delusion to make fun) and therefore experienced as an unjust wrong, an unacceptable smear, a bad start, an indelible mark and a sign of our incompetence and inadequacy.

Failure, however, also has an assonance with a phallus: it indicates vital energy, the act of sprouting and is a symbol of fertility.
What if failure was not a deception but a disclosure? Not a sneer but an opportunity? Not a defeat with no way out but a new opportunity for growth and learning?
By changing our perspective, we are able to consider failure as a lesson in humility, an experience of reality, an opportunity for reinventing ourselves and an approach to innovating and inventing,
a roadmap for making decisions, a learning method and a workout for our skills and talent.
We may find that failure is not always a tragedy, that success is interwoven with many defeats, and that failure is a good teacher.
It may provide us with information on who we are, what we really want, and which people really deserve to have us by their side.