Gregarious

Gregarious

From Latin gregarius, derived from grex gregis “flock”, “belonging to the multitude.

The word gregarious recalls – in its etymology – the idea of a group, of belonging to a whole. We may have a gregarious, passive attitude or, on the contrary, be a gregarious person playing an active role.
When we think of a cyclist, we imagine him as a solitary being, a lone wolf who only thinks about hitting the next pedal stroke, with the sole aim of winning the race.
But the truth is that most cyclists always race to never win. If the wingmen do their job well, it is the captain who will have the chance to win the race and receive the honours and glory.

Of course there are outsiders, followers with the freedom to try to win, but for almost all athletes there is only one rule: to sacrifice everything for the leader because their defeat will consolidate his victory and his winning will originate from them.
Being a good wingman means carrying the burdens of others, water bottles and frustrations to drive the other person – stronger – to victory.
Being captain is an exception. Most people are not winners; they are not losers but invisible champions. We really need more people like this because wingmen are much more valuable than they seem.