Focus on the present

Focus on the present

From Latin, focus “fire”, “domestic hearth”, derived “to focus”, “point of convergence of attention”, from Latin, prae “before” and sum “are”, “the thing that is placed before”, “offer”, “gift”.

When we perform a task or work on a project, so absorbed by what we are doing that we lose track of time, then it means we have experienced what it means to “be in the flow” (or “to be in a state of flow”), that is being in a state of full immersion in an activity, in which the sense of self is lost.

The resulting sensation is all-encompassing, a mix of total focus and maximum pleasure, a state of concentration so complete that it allows us to keep the goal and the final result in mind we want to achieve, while we get lost completely in our task.
Being in the flow is engaging and enjoyable, and often better results are obtained when we are in this state: ego disappears, time flies or seems to stop as we are so focussed on the present and every action and thought inevitably flows on from the previous one.

Being in the state of flow makes us almost impervious to external distractions, oversights and blunders and promotes implicit or unconscious learning: we learn by acting, stopping, falling and focussing on the experience of the present moment.