Happiness

Happiness

From the Old Norse term happ meaning “luck” or “chance”. It is also related to the Old English word hæpic meaning “equal”. From the Greek φύω “I produce”, “I make to be”, “I generate”.

Happiness is often confused with the word contentment and associated with the notion that only when you are successful are you genuinely happy, tying happiness – in this way – to a goal instead of a purpose, to the destination and not to the journey.
Happy is not a synonym of “feeling good” or “being happy”, but it means having the desire to change and evolve also by living experiences that are not just positive ones.
Contentment refers to the concept of content: it presupposes being satisfied and, therefore, being satisfied with what we already are.

Happiness, on the other hand, is a state of restlessness, a tension to generate and to do more and better.
In fact, happiness indicates the state that a person lives when he gives life to new things because what he has is not enough.
Happiness is a choice but also the outcome of courageous actions that undermine concerns and fears: that of making mistakes, of failing and of taking risks.
A life consisting of only successes and happy moments is not suited to any human being: happy moments prolonged over time are not possible for biological reasons. And to make room for new moments, it is sometimes necessary to have the courage to destroy pleasant sensations and get out of a state of comforting contentment.

Obsessed by the craving for control, by the need to appear perfect, efficient and highly performant, we have slowly unlearned the magic that comes from surprise and the opportunities that lie behind every crisis and every tension.