Lateral Thinking

Lateral Thinking

One of the biggest obstacles to the ability to think outside the box is the habit of taking already beaten paths for fear of making mistakes and failing and simplifying reasoning by looking for shortcuts along the way, betting only when the outcome is certain.
But often the solution lies outside the boundaries imposed, or that we have imposed on ourselves and it would be enough to deviate the trajectory to find new answers to old problems.

This deviation may be achieved by training lateral thinking through exercises and games.
Lateral thinking is non-logical consequential thinking, while being intuitive and horizontal thinking at the same time.
It proceeds by leaps because it does not follow a linear reasoning trajectory.
It is a productive process generating ideas that, by suspending judgement, error is valued as a source of feedback, creativity and imagination is able to view things differently, observing the problem from different angles and, by taking this route, alternative solutions compared to obvious ones are generated.

Lateral thinking – alternative and complementary to analytical thinking – helps us not to take anything for granted, to understand that sometimes it is necessary to eliminate rather than add, give up rather than persist, doubt instead of anchoring ourselves to our certainties and accept errors and not conceal them. It helps us to understand that it is important not to contest or censor other people’s ideas and that we need to accept points of view that differ from our own because nothing is irrelevant.

In seeking and processing new ideas, lateral thinking is open to intrusions made by chance. Random circumstances take on valuable significance because what are seen as fortuitous events may be the origin of new discoveries.
It is a thought process that is in no hurry to make sense of what happens during the process nor to find the correct answer in the shortest possible time.
Waiting is therefore not a variable that generates anxiety but an added value, an integral part of the discovery process.
And, likewise, error is an integral part of this process. Giving ourselves the luxury of making mistakes may lead us to as yet unexplored thinking spaces.