Intelligence

Intelligence

From Latin Intellegere “notice”, “perceive”, “understand”.

There is no single definition of intelligence and each definition is affected by the thinking approach underlying it and by the different methodological approaches that each school adopts. We prefer the approach that defines intelligence as a set of mental processes that allow an individual to reason, make assessments, pursue a purpose, solve problems, self-correct and place himself in a dialectical relationship with the environment and adapt to it. And it manifests and expresses itself through a large number of thoughts, behaviours, actions and emotions.

There is no single form of intelligence, but intelligences are plural (Body-Kinaesthetic Intelligence, Musical Intelligence, Interpersonal Intelligence, Intrapersonal Intelligence, Linguistic Intelligence, Logical-Mathematical Intelligence, Spatial Intelligence, Naturalistic Intelligence, Existential Intelligence, Moral Intelligence and Spiritual Intelligence) and their evolution depends not exclusively on genetic factors but on the socio-cultural context and learning opportunities. This means that each of us has our own specific intellectual profile and that each type of intelligence may be developed, trained and expanded. Although, in our society, there is a tendency to value mathematical logic more highly, all types of intelligence are necessary and important for successfully adapting to the environment and responding adequately to changes, as well as for individual and social development.
For our purposes, we will be taking a closer look at only certain types of intelligence and the relationship of soft skills with the topic of error and failure.