Risking

Risking

From Byzantine Greek rhizikò “fate”, “destiny” or from the Arabic rizq “tax”, “burden”.

There is only one way to always make choices that appear to be perfect or that may be validated in the short term: avoid taking risks.
We are deeply averse to risk taking because we are afraid of making mistakes, making choices that will cause us to suffer and making decisions that may turn out to be far from meeting our expectations.
The good news is that we can calculate the risk. In other words, we can measure the likelihood that a certain event will occur or not; or rather, we can calculate the frequency with which such an event will occur.
If in a linear world certainty dominates and each of us is able to predict the future, and in a complex world uncertainty dominates and in a complicated world, we can calculate risks and make decisions based on statistical reasoning and logic. In fact, risk is different from uncertainty. And the best decision under risk conditions is not always the best under uncertain ones.
But what does taking risks mean? Taking risks means taking responsibility for our choices, regardless of the final result and accepting the possibility that events may go in a different direction from the one we hoped for. People who are open to risk taking are those that understand how to fully embrace what is happening to them. Accepting a positive outcome also means accepting a negative one.

People who take risks are free: they have the ability to observe the events through the eyes of a visionary and show willingness to sacrifice marking a leader and, forced to choose between taking action and not taking action, they prefer to accept the possibility of encountering an “inconvenient” stumbling block.

People’s different risk attitude depends more on previous cultural and social factors than on actual biological differences based, for example, on gender. Risk aversion is not a personality trait, but it is the social imitation of fear that leads us to take socially accepted risks or to avoid anything that the group or people like us may be afraid of.
It is the context in which we live, the culture in which we grow up and in which we are immersed that causes us to fear our choices, to make ourselves averse to risk and errors and to become aware that change is not always negative. It is often the context that provides us with no defence against error, reinforcing the fear of failure and disrupting the process of discovery and challenge that lies at the root of human progress.