Taboo

Taboo

From the Polynesian tà “mark” and pu “sacred”, “prohibited”.

A taboo is the prohibition of a magical-religious nature against things, people and places considered sacred from time to time, or contaminating and impure and therefore potentially dangerous. A particular kind of taboo is one which concerns words; it is based on the conception according to which, the name of a thing is equivalent to the thing itself; it evokes its presence for all intents and purposes.

Taboo is a prohibition that acquires, in our case, the form of two words that we find it difficult to pronounce and even more to experience them due to their being conceived as anomalous, exceptions and sources of risk and crisis for life and for organised systems.
And this is paradoxical given that our brain – so neuroscientists argue – learns precisely through trial and error. “We learn by making mistakes” is not just a saying: our brain, since we came into the world, is structured to make mistakes and learn from falls and slips.